Close Up Lamps In The Kitchen Apartment Therapy

tech lighting Close Up Lamps In The Kitchen Apartment Therapy

tech lighting Close Up Lamps In The Kitchen Apartment Therapy

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In a kitchen from My Scandinavian Home, a simple but striking light fixture immediately draws the eye.

There’s a lot going on in this kitchen—that marble backsplash is to die for—but the chandelier hanging over the island is definitely the star of the show. It’s available from Beacon Lighting for $895 (AUD).

Other lamps we think could be great in the right kitchen: Recycled Chopsticks Table Lamps Meridian Table Lamps Milk Glass Table Lamps from Pottery Barn Haley Table Lamp from Crate & Barrel Bleu Nature Table Lamp

A funky light fixture (and funky glass cabinets) make this kitchen from Logan Killen Interiors, via Brit + Co.

Last week I talked about properly lighting a living room, and today I’m going to tackle the kitchen, with the same end goal in mind: to have a fully functional space with sufficient amounts of general, task and accent lighting.

(Image credit: Philip and Olivia’s All the Fun of the Fair House)

Lamps in the Kitchen: What Do You Think? Jesse’s Tuned-in Space

A beautiful modern fixture steals the show in this upstate New York home from Dwell. (Those cabinets are worth a look, too.)

Two dramatic pendant lights steal the show in this rustic kitchen spotted on French by Design.

A row of wall-mounted sconces sheds light on this unique kitchen from deVOL.

What do you think? We’d love to hear your thoughts on which one you’d add to your own kitchen, or share your dream lighting in the comments below.

Last fall, The Kitchn asked its readers what they thought about lamps in the kitchen. We’ve since noticed them more and more, and find the effect generally useful, warm, and a little odd (in a good way). We especially like the way Kelly and Brian combine whites and porcelain in both their kitchen and dining areas. A few more examples below, as well as some lamp selections we’d love to see put to use while cooking or eating:

Keep in mind that when you have a central island in your kitchen, the lighting above it will need to contribute to at least two, if not all of these lighting types. It is general lighting because it’s in the center of the room, task if you use the island as a workspace, and accent if you gather around it as a social hub when not working. One large attractive pendent, or a group of smaller ones, should cover all bases if hung at the right level and is dimmable.

Lighting isn’t usually the first thing you notice about a kitchen—if you notice it at all. But these 13 kitchens are the exception to that rule. Here, dramatic pendants, sconces and chandeliers serve as a reminder that a kitchen can be both functional and beautiful.

A row of task lamps clipped to a single wall shelf makes for especially dramatic lighting in this Danish kitchen from Cereal.

Accent lighting in the kitchen is primarily used to highlight the architectural features of the space and is often decorative; for example, internal lighting within glass-fronted cupboards, LED strip lighting along the base of an island, or a wall-hung neon sign saying “EAT.” This type of lighting in inviting and enhances the ambiance of the space, particularly at night or when the other lighting types aren’t in use.

The kitchen of this Brooklyn brownstone, spotted on Design*Sponge, sports an intricate fixture that creates a lovely contrast to the home’s modern style.

This Swedish kitchen from Milk Decoration features Constance Guisset’s Vertigo suspension lamp, one of the most beautiful and most dramatic light fixtures out there (and also one of my favorites since I first spotted it in Amandine & Amaury’s Paris home.)

In a kitchen, it’s important to have enough general lighting. A single overhead pendant can work in a small room, but it’s even better when supplemented by pot lights or track lighting; here of all places, it’s important to see what you’re doing and avoid eye strain.

Task lighting in the kitchen primarily translates into having sufficient lighting on work surfaces, at a low enough level to be useful. Under-counter spotlights or tracks are tried and true, but with the current trend toward fewer upper cabinets and a more open-looking space, you’ve got to get creative. Wall-mounted desk-style lights are a fun and practical option, as is a row of smaller, low-hanging pendants along a countertop.

This swing-arm wall lamp, in a kitchen from Balingslov, brings a touch of excitement to a well-behaved modern space.

A dramatic chandelier and bold black sconces are the perfect accents in this all-white kitchen from Coco Lapine Design.

The lighting isn’t the only dramatic thing about this kitchen from Vogue Living… but it’s definitely dramatic.

The kitchen: it’s the laboratory of the home, where we “work” to create meals for ourselves and those we live with. Conversely, it’s also often the social hub of the home, where friends gather at parties or even where you might like to hang out solo, just reading a book or listening to the radio. With these dual purposes in mind, it’s often tricky to strike the right lighting balance. Here’s how to get it right:

Drama, Drama, Drama: 13 Kitchens with Scene-Stealing Lighting

Close Up Lamps In The Kitchen Apartment Therapy