Indoor Photography Lighting Setup

tech lighting Indoor Photography Lighting Setup

tech lighting Indoor Photography Lighting Setup

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Experiment with how much power your flash is using. Full power, versus 1/4 power, etc.

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To start with, set the key light behind or beside the camera, to the right (subject’s left). This is assuming that the key light will be off camera. If it is on its own, use a tripod. The main light adds definition and highlight to the subject.

Once all the lights are set up, start moving them around. Move them closer and further away from the subject to see which result you get.

For this head shot session in the image above at Spokane Gymnastics, we had to shoot in the retail area of the gym because hundreds of kids were attending summer camp and the whole place was buzzing with activity. This was the only quiet corner and the owner needed a head shot the next day for an upcoming press feature so we couldn’t reschedule. We cleared a space in the corner and used some gymnastics mats for apple boxes and my trusty umbrella softbox speedlite modifier. This  is definitely a more dramatic lighting look, with no fill light on the opposite side.

Last week in my article No Studio? No Problem: How to Create Stunning Head Shots in Any Location, I promised to follow up with some specific examples, including behind-the-scenes shots and lighting diagrams. Without further ado, here are 5 simple lighting setup for portraits on-location, perfect for beginning photographers and the working photographer too.

Using window light plus a reflector is one of my favorite lighting setups for head shots and indoor portraits because the light is generally very flattering. In this behind-the-scenes look at a head shot session for a day spa in Spokane, I had brought all my lighting gear with me but ended up just using the natural light coming in from the giant windows in the lobby.

Lighting Tips No Studio? No Problem: 5 Simple Lighting Setups for Portraits On-location

NO STUDIO? NO PROBLEM! PART 5: CREATING AUTHENTIC PORTRAITS IN YOUR BACK YARD NO STUDIO? NO PROBLEM: HOW TO CREATE STUNNING HEAD SHOTS IN ANY LOCATION

Alternately, you can add a second light, but that starts to get more complicated. To keep things simple, reflecting some of the light from a single light source is a great way to go. That’s exactly what I did here and this ended up being a favorite image of the client.

CREDITS: Photographs by Tanya Smith are copyrighted and have been used with permission for SLR Lounge. Do not copy, modify or re-post this article or images without express permission from SLR Lounge and the artist.

Español: montar iluminación interior para fotografía, Italiano: Disporre le Luci per un Set Fotografico in Interni, Português: Ajustar a Iluminação de Interiores para Fotografias

Add the fill light. The fill light is a less powerful light that helps fill in some of the shadows without blowing out parts of the photograph. Set it up directly in front of the subject. Make sure that: It is aimed lower than the main light.

It is positioned lower than the main light. Use less fill light if you want more shadows. Make sure that it is less powerful than the main light.

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Window light coming in from the side and then bouncing light from the opposite side with a reflector is another favorite lighting setup. Any corner near a window works great for this. I took this head shot for a local property manager in a corner near a huge window in my living room.

As well as changing the distance of the lights, work on the angles. Try them lower and higher.

For a more in-depth look at simple lighting set ups, I highly recommend you watch Photography 101, Lighting 101 and 201 available as part of the SLR Lounge Premium Membership. That’s all the education you’ll need to start shooting on-location in any lighting situation. There are also lots of great stuff on CreativeLive, and they’re having a huge sale right now.

When natural light isn’t available, which is often the case in Washington, especially during the winter when it’s dark by 4:00 p.m., having an umbrella that works with a speedlite is a must. My favorite affordable umbrella for speedlites is this one by Neewer, which I used on this shoot for a Seattle tech evangelist. We shot these in his dining room and it was a really cramped, small space. For a more dramatic look, I used only one light. For much of the shoot we used two lights with umbrellas, one on each side of him at a 45 degree angle. I used an inexpensive piece of white fleece clamped to a Backdrop Stand for the backdrop.

If you are creating an indoor studio, whether temporary or permanent, you will need to have a good and consistent lighting for the best portraits. Rather than haphazardly placing lights around your studio space, read below the jump for helpful instructions on setting up indoor photography lights.

The image above is another example of a similar setup with the subject sitting at a table in the corner of a cupcake shop. I had an assistant hold the reflector.

If the shadows from one light are too dramatic for your taste, you can always bring in a reflector on the other side or below the model’s face (just like in the window-light examples above) to add fill to the shadow side of the face.

If the wall is a color other than white it will cause a color cast to affect the tones of your subject that can be difficult to adjust. You could have an assistant hold a reflector to the side of your subject and bounce your on-camera flash off the reflector for a similar effect. For more details on the on-camera flash bounce method, watch Lighting 101.

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In this example taken at Spokane Gymnastics, I’m using a Canon Speedlite attached to my camera hotshoe. I directed the flash upward and to camera right where there was a white corner and ceiling. The wall and ceiling ended up acting as a large softbox when the light bounced back on to the face of my subject (below). This is a great and common trick if you have a white wall and/or ceiling available to you.

To make make shift lights, use reflective materials to have more light or use a see through fabric for a more even and soft touch.

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For more shooting on-location tips, check out the other articles in my No Studio? No Problem Series:

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I placed my subject in the corner on the left and then had an assistant hold the reflector as close to her face as we could get it without it showing up in the frame, bouncing some of the light to fill in the shadowed area of the face.

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I tried shooting from a few different angles but ended up liking the lighting and background best when shooting from straight on with the window directly behind. An assistant is holding a reflector below the subject’s torso to fill in any shadows under the eyes.

Set up the hair light. The hair light (also called backlighting or rim lighting), separates the background from the subject and helps bring it out. If you have a light background or want the subject to blend in with the background, don’t use it.

You can set up the rim lighting above or below the subject, depending on how you want the effect.

Have the recommended minimum of 3 three lights. You will get the best effect, if you do. Having said that, if you don’t, make adjustments, such as your lights and the window, and you can use your wall and ceiling as a reflectors for the light you do have.

The lights are the main light, fill light, and the hair or rim light.

Indoor Photography Lighting Setup